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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 25, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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it to our destination. that's it for "way too early." "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ we all have a right to be proud of our state tonight. thank you very much. thank you for this wonderful honor and wonderful challenge that lies ahead. >> before this race ends, we have to be absolutely certain that the republican primary was won by republican voters. there is something a bit unusual about a republican primary that's decided by liberal democrats. >> he's not the first person who said that before. you know who else said that? people who worked on eric cantor's campaign. people like him were complaining when it happened to eric cantor. he thought it was a pretty cool
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thing, but now it's the worst thing. >> if you're just waking up, the primary in mississippi is finally over, but the losing candidate doesn't think so. he's not conceding. last night incumbent thad cochran narrowly edged out tea party challenger chris mcdaniel. >> that was a humdinger as a certain college football coach used to say. just three weeks ago in the primary battle mcdaniel got more votes, but didn't get over 50%. he had all the momentum going into yesterday's runoff, last night with nearly 56,000 more voters going to the polls, 56,000 more voters going to a poll in a late june runoff, that's shocking. that's just shocking. thad cochran pulled out a narrow victory. >> good morning everyone. it's wednesday, june 25th, welcome to "morning joe." with us we have "morning joe" contributor john heilemann,
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msnbc's former democratic congressman harold ford junior. president and ceo of politico jim vandehei and in washington associate editor of "the washington post" and msnbc political analyst gene robinson. >> gene, let's start with you. shocking result. if you look at what happened in mississippi, what happened in oklahoma, a lot of people that were backed by the likes of ted cruz and sarah palin and club for growth and a lot of the tea party groups went up in flames. >> not a great night for the tea party. a good night for the republican establishment. great night for haylee barbour and his folks in mississippi, for thad cochran. chris mcdaniel, it will be interesting to see how long it takes him to deal with the reality that, you know, he didn't win this race. he didn't win it and those
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liberal democrats who allegedly came out and voted against eric cantor came out and voted against him. >> they sure did. it happens. you have a primary and those are the rules. >> he has a mechanism, he cannot concede. >> let's go quickly and then get to the main news. quick reaction to last night. shocking? >> pretty darn surprising. out of all the races, i think we make too much of this establishment versus tea party. in this case the guys turned out 50,000 additional voters. >> i don't like eric cantor, but he clearly lost connectivity with his district. thad cochran didn't with the state. is it a surprise? it is. >> it's shocking. we have three republicans on the set yesterday for the first time in "morning joe" history. you go back to 1947, that never happened. all three of us said the way the
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republican primaries and runoffs work thad cochran didn't have a chance. i'm stunned. >> echoing what eugene said, a great victory for heyly barbour and the whole mississippi establishment world, when the runoff was going to happen, they flooded down there. >> let's talk about that. the mississippi runoff defied conventional wisdom. the cochran campaign got help from the national republican senatorial committee and big names like the barbours who helped turn out voters in strong areas, seeking out african-americans making the argument that cochran delivered for mississippi. it worked. several african-american communities saw major jumps. heinz county 70% african-american, cochran increased turnout there by nearly 50% from the previous
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election, to the tune of thousands of votes. mcdaniel has called the tactics to get liberals to vote in the republican primary illegal. last night he stopped well short of con seegd, even being introduced, get this, introduced as the republican nominee. >> this is not the party of reagan, but we're not done fighting. when we're done, it will be. >> there were literally dozens of irregularities reported all across this state. it's our job to make sure the sanctity of the vote is upheld. before this race ends, we have to be absolutely certain to the republican primary was won by republican voters. >> john heilemann, pat buchanan always talks about political athletes and talking about 2008
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hillary's back against the wall, a great political athlete. this guy is not. as i said yesterday, thad cochran is not my type of republican, he drove me crazy, a big ap proep eighter, spends a lot of money. a lot of mississippi people think he's too establishment, too big of a spender. but a lot of it just comes down to who were you running against? you look at eric cantor, he had a really good challenger, a solid guy. that's why he won. in this case, this guy was a clown. you go back and listen to some of the things he said about women, the overtones about race. there's a reason african-american got out and voted against this guy. he scared them for good reason because of some things that he said that concerned him. >> in the kantor race, the difference is the factor is a runoff. it gave the barbour forces a chance to regroup and it gave the state, including the
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african-american voters who normally don't show up in a republican primary, a chance to pause. in this case the pause allowed for reality to sink in, reality for a lot of voters. the think you're talking about about athletes, i keep thinking, you wash the nba play-offs, close a quarter, close a game. this guy didn't know how to close. >> he hasn't closed yet. >> he hasn't closed yesterday. let's go to oklahoma, so much to get to, republican tea party candidate t.w. shannon brought big names to help back his bid for united states senate. >> something incredible is happening. liberty is under assault but millions are standing up to turn our nation around. in oklahoma there are a number of good senate candidates. but t.w. shannon is a conservative fighter. he has the courage to look
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washington insiders in the eye and say i don't work for you. i work for the people of oklahoma. >> he's such a good guy. his name alone, the democrats accuse us of not embracing diversity? oh, my goodness. he is it. he is the whole package. >> wow. >> ted cruz, sarah palin. >> what do you say harold ford? >> if i was a republican, i might have started for t.w. >> start being an oklahoma fan now. >> i'm a sooner. >> oh, my god. that was star power. >> that was a great save. the ball was going out of bounds and you grabbed it. >> those people draw crowds. >> they really do. this was a sharp candidate, but, you know, make your point, though. what was the night like for that group that went out campaigning --? >> it was terrible.
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very interesting. tom coburn, we had him on the show about a month ago. what tom coburn said was, you know, oklahomans, we don't need outsiders coming out telling us how to vote. >> why don't we show you that. >> this is tom on our show. >> i think they'll be a backlash -- oklahomans don't like being told who to vote for. if you'll recall in 2004 when i ran, washington was telling them what republican to vote for and spent millions of dollars backing that individual, and that individual ended up getting about 30% of the vote when i got 62. as a matter of fact, there's been op eds written on it. they just assume everybody stay out and let us figure it out. >> would bit the coburn common sense that will pull through or the palin-cruz star power?
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>> harold is on the side of sarah palin. i don't think that carried the day. >> no, it did not. >> we're not being sarcastic. >> we're not being sarcastic when we suggest it's time for ted cruz and sarah palin to pile back into the clown car and drive off to some other state -- >> did he just say that? >> i think your take on sarah palin is far different than harold ford's this morning. >> harold begs to differ. >> there's a cruz curse. >> what is that? >> look at what he's doing in the leadership race. look at the leadership races, the people he's endorsing in these primaries. way more often than not he's losing. he's been losing since he forced the party into a government shutdown. the ted cruz wing of the party is a distinct minority of the party. there's lots of people who are very conservative who do not share his world view and share his hard edge.
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his hard edge is not for bail. >> what was interesting about that, there was that period after 2008 heading into 2010 where sarah palin had the opposite effect. she was helping a lot of candidates. she was winning a lot of primaries for -- >> everywhere sarah palin went, the candidates seemed to go. >> she endorsed cruz. >> it's hard, though, to put this on ted cruz. something else much bigger has happened. the republican establishment is awakened. they saw what happened in 2010. they know that harry reid should be back in nevada right now going to boxing matches in his pajamas and flip-flops. instead he's still running the united states senate. the only reason that happened is because the republican establishment fell asleep and let a lot of people from clown cars win nominations, sharon engel should have never gotten through, harry reid should have been beaten. you can go to delaware, the
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woman who said she's not a witch. >> she's not a witch. >> in indiana, if they put cassell in, that should have been another republican vote. indiana should have been another republican vote against harry reid. i know a lot of conservatives are angry. thad cochran is not my type of republican, but there's one thing you know this morning, mississippi is in the republican column. you got a guy going to washington, d.c. that's not going to vote for harry reid as majority leader. a lot of republicans who in 2010 like myself were glad to see real small government conservatives get elected, at this point would just like to see harry reid go home and stop running the united states senate. that happened, too. i'm just saying it's not fair to say this is all ted cruz. 2014 is radically different -- >> he's not the complete republican party. >> he's a part of the republican party. if i'm running for office, i
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sure as hell want the ted cruz wing on my side because they're knocking on doors -- i've said this before. they're making the phone calls, they're going to the rallies, they're driving the campaigns. this idea they have to choose one or the other, democrats don't choose one or the other. why does the lib ram media say we have to choose one or the other. >> this is not a pickup. thad cochran winning is a whole -- you've got two big races, one in georgia and kentucky where democrats have a chance. >> i understand saying that if mcdaniel had won there was a question mark, political observers said, over whether democrats -- >> was there really a chance that mississippi was going to go in the democratic column? very dubious on that score. i just don't -- didn't see mississippi going d.
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>> i don't either, but you know what? the republican party would have had to spend some money. they would have had to be worried about it. chris mcdaniel has a long history of inflammatory remarks. if lightning struck, there was a possibility they would have had to go in. now they don't have to worry, thad is going up there and now they can focus on georgia, they can focus on kentucky. they can focus on north carolina, louisiana. >> okay. so can i -- charlie rangel won as well. >> that's the last time we'll get to say that. that's his last time. he says he's not going to run again. >> he's going to run again. >> he's declaring victory, by the way. hasn't actually been called yet. i want to get to former president bill clinton, he's defending his wife, former secretary of state hillary clinton, from criticism over their family's financial status. it stems from comments made on
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her book tour when the possible 2016 candidate said her family was dead broke when they left the white house. she later said she and her husband are unlike other millionaires who are, quote, truly well off -- >> how much are they worth? >> a lot. >> $100 million? >> so much, in an nbc exclusive david gregory asked the former president about the perception of being out of touch. >> do you understand some people who have been critical clinton, secretary clinton who initially had to explain talking about being dead broke coming out of the white house, or said in an interview -- >> i might understand it differently than you do. it is factually true that we were several million dollars in debt. everybody now assumes that what happened in the intervening years was automatic. i'm shocked it's happened. i'm shocked that people still want me to come give talks. i'm grateful. >> when you say you pay ordinary taxes -- secretary clinton said
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unlike other people who are really well off maybe just on capital gains, can you understand as a political matter that that can strike people as being out of touch. >> yu, but she's not out of touch. she advocated and worked as a senator for things that were good for ordinary people. and before that, all her life -- the people asking her questions should put this into some sort of context. i think i had the lowest net worth of any president in the 20th century when i took office, but i still could have been tone deaf. now i don't and we've got a good life and i'm grateful for it, but i still -- we go to our local grocery store on the weekend. we talk to people in our town. we know what's going on. the real issue, if you've been fortunate enough to be successful, are you now out of touch and insensitivity to the
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agonizing struggles other people are facing? that's the real issue. >> i don't understand -- by the way, bill clinton exclusive, i'm going to be watching. i know you are, too, on "meet the press." that's going to be incredible. we all said the same thing, it was going fine -- >> but then he says we all go to our local grocery store except when we have our help go to our local grocery store. >> the local grocery store in his town is not the same -- >> people go to grocery stores for different reasons. anyway, why can't they just say, guess what, i used to not have money at all, i had to borrow $150 -- >> stop. i don't like when you do -- >> from my parents to get my son joey a bass guitar. guess what? now i got lots of money and i worked my ass off to get lots of money and i worked around the
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clock for 25 years to get lots of money. you know what? i am blessed. i am blessed to be an american. i am blessed that hard work pays off. i'm blessed to be the luckiest guy on the face of the earth. but yes, i'm rich. but that's not the issue because fdr was rich, reagan was rich by the time he was president. a lot of great presidents were rich. the question is can you still relate to people. it has nothing to do with going to the grocery store. just say it, they're rich and get over it. we don't care. >> that could be bill clinton's response. i think from the get-go hillary clinton's could have been so different and so groundbreaking. i think she could have say, no, we've done incredibly well. we left the white house in debt but that was easily fixed by the work we were able to do. put aside what bill made, i made a lot of money and i want to be a ground breaker for women and make sure i lift them up and help many more women make a lot of money. would that have hurt people? >> it's the difference between
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republicans and democrats. we're proud when we work hard and make lots of money. i think some democrats are just guilty. maybe they feel guilty about being rich. >> do you really think -- >> ari is here, very proud to be rich. >> he just took a bath in money. >> why can't we just say i'm rich and proud of it. >> are you suggesting bill clinton is guilt ridden when he goes to bed every night? i'm not picturing that. >> why can't they just say we're wealthy and we're proud of it? >> i think she skrould made -- >> we worked hard, made a lot of money. god bless america. >> i thought he did say that though. >> he did but then he did the local grocery store. who cares. >> part of the argument against her is because she has found herself in different financial
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situations, she's doesn't have the ability to understand owed oh. >> she's out of touch, i'm out of touch, everybody around the table is out of touch. >> harold is not out of touch. >> do not say that about my friend harold ford. >> we're all out of touch with what a working class single mom is going through in st. louis, missouri. we're all out of touch. it's our responsibility to get in touch. but please, let's stop pretending that we understand what it's like waking up at 4:00 in the morning and having to go to the early shift and rushing home and getting your kids from work and taking your kids home and then rushing to a second job. they're out of touch. say they're out of touch. we're all out of touch. it's their responsibility to get in touch. gene? >> the difference is when you go to that local grocery store and
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mingle -- after you've mingled with the towns people, are you at all concerned when you're in the checkout line, you just get what you want or are you standing there saying, if i buy -- >> they're in chap qua. >> ground beef, i can't afford this other thing my kids need. that's the difference. >> they ain't in east st. louis, they're in chap qua, new york. >> there are not many politicians who face the kind of predicament that gene just described. i'm not saying there are none, but there are not many. the question becomes what kind of policies, what kind of ideas do you put forward to correct those challenges and deal with and help people confront challenges like the ones you describe, joe. i would argue hillary clinton and bill clinton for the bulk of their public life, not all of it, have been dedicated to voters. >> dude, i agree with you.
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we're saying the same thing. mika, as i said last week, by the time somebody is in a position to run for president of the united states and win, they have been in a bubble for 20, 25 years. the clintons had people driving them around as governor for 20 years, whatever. reagan was a movie star for 20 years. go back. everybody is in a bubble. so the clintons can just say it and move the hell on and talk about helping working class americans. still ahead on "morning joe," celebrating an american hero -- >> do you agree with me? >> i always agree with you. >> america's most recent medal of honor recipient william kyle carper joins us with his remarkable story, in our 7:00 hour. an early draft of bob dylan's "like a rolling stone" is auctioned off for a ridiculous amount of money. >> save your notes, harold.
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we'll auction those later. >> i went to a grocery store to show it off in my hometown. why the no-fly list could be a thing of the past. we'll explain. but first let's go to bill karins. >> mika, you always agree with me, too, right? >> whatever you say. how you doing bill karins? >> everything all right. not too bad. a little rainy. not too bad. >> you're in touch with the working man, aren't you? >> i very much am. i removed that tree stump from my back yard. >> look at you, mr. populous with your tree stump. >> chopping down cherry trees next. let's get to the forecast, as far as the rain goes today, from areas from buffalo, cleveland, erie, through new england, rain through vermont and new hampshire. we'll get a good soaking. it hasn't rained in about a week in many areas of new englandment about a half inch around philly, maybe an inch around hartford.
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if you're traveling at the airports today, it looks like it will be late for today. you're fine during the daylight hours, once we get through the late afternoon and evening, that's the chance of thunderstorms affecting travel plans in new england and the mid atlantic. we'll get soaked once again in areas of the south. we had a lot of thunderstorms yesterday around the houston area. also dallas and ft. worth had flooding. nothing as bad as indiana. a small tornado, wasn't big, maybe 80 to about 100-mile-per-hour winds, but it did do significant damage to about two or three homes. you can see the tornado briefly behind the garage. there is damage left behind in plain field, indiana. i don't expect many tornadoes again today. there once many yesterday. all it takes is one. we leave you with a shot of new york city. humidity is back in the air in new england. we're locked in the clouds. you can barely see a building on your right. nothing on the bottom. that's going to lead to airport delays if it doesn't lift soon.
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you're watching "morning joe." ♪ ♪ ♪ [ girl ] my mom, she makes underwater fans that are powered by the moon. ♪ [ birds squawking ] my mom makes airplane engines that can talk.
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[ birds squawking ] ♪ my mom makes hospitals you can hold in your hand. ♪ my mom can print amazing things right from her computer. [ whirring ] [ train whistle blows ] my mom makes trains that are friends with trees. [ train whistle blows ] ♪ my mom works at ge. ♪
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♪ ari is talking to my daughter. is that okay? >> that is not okay. >> let's take a look at the morning papers. the "wall street journal," u.s. set to export unrefined oil for the first time in nearly four decades. the commerce department has given permission to two companies to ship an ultra light oil to foreign buyers that can be turned into gasoline, jet fuel and diesel. shipments could begin as early as august. >> the or grown y'all, ordered to modify the no-fly list. a federal judge ruled the list unconstitutional saying passengers had no way to challenge the decision. 13 muslim americans are behind the lawsuit, four of which are veterans of the u.s. military.
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>> a draft of the lyrics to bob dylan's "like a rolling stone" sold for $2 million. >> two million. >> yesterday at an auction in new york. it's believed to be the highest price ever paid for a popular music manuscript. the draft is written on pencil on four sheets of stationery from a hotel in washington, d.c. it's the only known written draft of the song. dylan was just 24 when he recorded it in 1965. >> joe doesn't want to admit it, but he bought that. >> "the boston globe" says researchers have a 3d mammogram that could significantly increase the rate of breast cancer detections, similar to a cat scan, they reported a 41% increase in the detection of potentially lethal cancers. coming up, the bite felt around the world. who does this and who is allowed
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to continue -- >> after the age of 2, almost no one. >> the career hat trick of biting into an opponent. what the heck is going on? >> he's a biter. he's like mike tyson. >> "morning joe" sports is next. ♪ unlimited cash back.
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>> bill's a biter. >> i am a biter. how do we know this? >> you walked right into that. you know he's a perv and he always says inappropriate things. he's a biter? where does he bite? >> don't make it worse. >> you don't have any marks, right? >> what did i tell you. >> she started it. >> i'm going to tell you to not call bill karins at the top of the sports segment. >> how many hick keeys have youd in your life? >> i'm going to talk to ari. >> let's talk to liverpool, golden boot, 31 goals.
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liverpool is in trouble. >> actually i think this helps liverpool. he was about to go to barcelona. he's not going now. >> for the third time, and it all happened in yesterday's match between italy and uruguay. goden's late goal, clinched the spot in the round of 16. the match overshadowed by this incident where luis suarez, didn't just appear -- he bites him right on the shoulder. >> he's a biter. >> you can see a closer up view there, pushes him, nudges him. >> it's not the first time this guy has bitten somewhere. >> third time. >> he's a proven biter. >> the cannibal of iax and now he did it here. >> it's so unfortunate, one of the great players in the world, the greatest perhaps, had an incredible year at liverpool, this is such a big moment at
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uruguay. he's going to be banned for a couple of years from fifa. >> two years is the max possible ban. >> think about it. he let his entire country down. >> they're on the high of all highs. >> they didn't even call a foul on this. >> no red card, no yellow card. >> look, he's got a bite mark. >> he has a bite mark. >> something that bill karins never leaves. >> never. of course, the social media world was going nuts with all of this. we even got one from evander holyfield, he knows about getting nibbled on the ear. he says i guess any part of the body is up for eating. >> i don't even know what that means. >> i don't either. >> almost like he was in mika's conversation earlier in the show. there was another shock yesterday. >> incredible. >> the story is italy is out, right? italy, spain, england, great
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teams are out. >> when is the last time there's been a world cup when neither england or italy got to -- >> or spain. >> the '50s, the '30s. >> probably back in the '30s because england has gotten through group play since 1958. >> england, italy and spain all not through. >> blaming the humidity down there. they're saying the south american countries have the advantage because they're not used to it. >> also, england sucks. >> the greeks were up 1-zip, amazing passing there. ivory coast was going to move on, but they called a penalty with 1:30 left in extra time. it was a penalty. it was in the box. it wasn't a lot, and greece, they netted the penalty kick. >> there was a moment that ivory coast should have scored. they somehow messed it up.
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>> ivory coast played well. >> our photographer nate took these shots after yesterday's game in a predominantly greek neighborhood in as tore yeah, queens, where people were celebrating in the streets. >> also a scoreless draw. >> england gets one point. >> let's go back to the astoria queens. a friend told me the whole place has just gone crazy. >> have you ever been there? >> of course. what about you? >> love astoria. >> let me ask you the mark halperin question, paris or staten island? >> staten island. >> our final piece of sports news, this one gearing up with
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all summer again, lebron james becoming a free agent. we'll have another big decision sitting there. the big question will dwyane wade and chris bosh opt out, also and they can add kyle lowry. >> can phil jackson work some magic with amare? >> so who gets lebron? >> miami is in the lead. don't rule out cleve. they could possibly add love, irving and still have a draft big in thompson. nay would be the nba favorite. >> do those people even exist? >> there are a lot of people who have always thought lebron would want to go back to cleveland. there's a chance that could happen. >> what do you think? >> he can only go back to someplace where he can win. if he goes back to miami, they
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can restructure. >> would he ever come to new york? >> if me lfrnltso wanted to be here, phil jackson -- greatest players of a generation, jordan, kobe and lebron. >> they don't have the money. >> amare would have to pass on $23 million. good luck with that. >> go back to cleveland, make the world right. >> he needs to make the world right. he knows he botched his move to miami. he needs to -- >> lives in akron, still, $10 million house. >> what match are you watching today? are you watching nigeria and argentina? >> not really. they're both going through, right? what's the other one? >> honduras and switzerland, bosnia and iran and ecuador and -- >> the switzerland game. tomorrow at 11:30 america stops, if you love america you'll be in front of your television set. if you're a socialist,
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communist -- if you love america, you'll be watching tomorrow at 11:30. coming up, mika has brought the must-read opinion pages back. you're talking about biting with bill karins and it's making us uncomfortable. maybe you do that in the south of france, but it makes us uncomfortable.
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if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about a biologic... this is humira. this is humira helping to relieve my pain. this is humira helping me lay the groundwork. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further damage. doctors have been prescribing humira for ten years. humira works by targeting and helping to block a specific source of inflammation that contributes to ra symptoms. humira is proven to help relieve pain and stop further joint damage in many adults. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma, or other types of cancer, have happened. blood, liver and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure have occurred. before starting humira, your doctor should test you for tb. ask your doctor if you live in or have been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. tell your doctor if you have had tb, hepatitis b,
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are prone to infections, or have symptoms such as fever, fatigue, cough, or sores. you should not start humira if you have any kind of infection. take the next step. talk to your doctor. this is humira at work. i'm multi-cultural. you americans have such a small view -- >> okay. our must-read piece is from
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politico. ken vogel writes about a well-funded democratic operative looking to beat the koch brothers at their own game. david brock is purportedly telling his party that there is no problem in spending millions of dollars on politics while simultaneously attacking the koch brothers for doing the same thing. according to the article -- >> look at that hair. his hair is as crazy as mine. >> not quite. it's in the ball park. >> it's getting close. >> according to the article, democrats are facing a fundamental strategic question. are we really that different from the kochs and do voters really care? >> you guys at politico have been writing stories about democrats ringing their hands and also this group that has gotten together. i don't remember the name of the
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group you're writing about. you said they're going to raise gazillions of dollars and their goal is to out-koch the koch brothers. >> we have all these multimillionaire, billionaires who want to put money into politics and they're tortured about it. should we do it by saying the cokoch brothers are criminals. it's hypocritical. if you care about politics, you should spend gobs of money. the campaign finance rules work in your favor. you can have -- >> barack obama became the first billion dollar candidate. he knows how to raise and spend money. >> exactly. both parties will race enormous sums of money. where do you get it? from people that have enormous sums of money. it would be lip critical. democrats can say our bill nairs are spending their money on
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behalf of the american people, on behalf of the ordinary american working class, whereas the koch brothers are spending their money on their own behalf so they can have car elevators in their mansions. >> i would love a car elevator in my mansion. obama tied himself up in knots over this question. well, we can't endorse a super pac, i won't be with them, but my operatives world. by the end of the campaign it totally collapsed and obama was out at jeffrey cat zen berg's house doing a fund-raiser. in tend they all take the money because you have to. >> harry reid has been such a hypocrite about the koch brothers saying their billionaires are bad and ours are good.
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>> voters don't care. >> first of all, voters don't care. what's happened? harry reid, politico has reported, has driven more money under ground and has inspired people to give more money to the koch brothers. people on twitter get riled up about the koch brothers. harry reid doesn't understand this back fires. it's driven more money under ground and have the koch brothers raising more money. >> voters don't care. >> if they did care, barack obama would have caught a lot of guff for breaking his promise in 2008 and destroying the public finance system. >> he talked about when he came back to the u.s. after his accident, first thing he saw when he was brought into the incredible hospital was koch brothers had funded it.
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he went through a list of all the incredible things he had done for this country. >> did he? lawrence o'donnell did? >> yes. >> they have done extraordinary thin things. >> willie geist is talking about aah what they've done for medical research, the arts, for lincoln center, for this city is unbelievable. you say i disagree with them and they're spending lots of money. >> it's convoluted. >> if we can just see the look. >> i want to see the split screen. >> joe, your hair is crazier. >> i think i have more lift. >> you can get that up higher. there you go. >> wow, that's amazing. >> please go to break. >> you and david brock. who knew? >> put that down. i don't want to see that anymore. coming up, talk about
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work-related stress, i'm stressed out right. what happened to a white house intern on her first day of the job? "morning joe" is back in a moment.
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t irs has historically only preserved backup tapes for six months. >> all right. the government agency whose entire business model relies on forcing americans to live as borderline hoarders, only keeps their [ bleep ] for six months? no. that's unacceptable. you never get a notice from the irs saying please bring your records down to us if you can find them. this is like if the e.p.a. was dumping its trash in the national zoo's spotted owl exhibit. each irs employee's e-mail box back then only held 150 megabytes of information also known as five pictures of your
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family. >> you know what, it's a tough one. i have to say. >> it's hilarious. >> stewart was on fire on the air. >> very good. if we learned anything from yesterday's -- >> he is right. >> he's always right. >> it would be good for democrats to be as assertive as jon stewart was. >> if we learned anything from yesterday's white house press briefing it's that working at 1600 pennsylvania avenue is not for the faint of heart. notice the woman in the back. oh, no. she faints in the middle of the new press secretary's remarks. he obviously cut the briefing short as staffers tended to the young woman. it was an intern's first day and that's what happened. oh, my gosh. is she okay? >> yes. >> nobody was hurt. >> i hate it when that happens. >> josh ernest, the new white house secretary, he did fine.
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stephen colbert said his name is basically saying, i'm kidding, but please take me seriously. >> it's not unfortunate that he seems comfortable. >> the press really likes him. to the extent there's been tension between the white house office, a very good guy. >> soft touch. >> really good relations with our people. a real advocate for more access. >> that's great. that's great. >> coming up at the top of the hour, thad cochran didn't have a lot of believers, but somehow he won his primary runoff. how did the mississippi senator pull that off? why chris mcdaniel says he's not conceding. >> a lot of troubled returns, mika, for the tea party. we'll break that down. and the clintons, still talking about their post white house hardships. but this time it's bill who is weighing in. chuck todd, david gregory, steve smith join the conversation.
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people in other parts go to work. that's not a coincidence. it's one more part of our commitment to america. >> that's the third time that luis suarez has committed that particular time. lebron james will opt out of the final two years of his contract and he'll become an unrestricted free agent. close race for new york's 13th congressional district. >> we have reviewed the results.
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this race is too close to call. >> charlie rangel! >> a nile-biter runoff thad cochran edged out chris mcdaniel. >> there is something a bit unusual about a republican primary that's decided by liberal democrats. >> bill clinton pushed back on accusations that his wife is somehow out of touch. >> she's not out of touch. and she's advocated and worked as a senator for things that were good for ordinary people. i.s.i.s. moves in whole convoys of u.s.-made humvees and gaining recruits along the way, some of them just children. i want that hard drive and the hard drive of every computer that crashed. >> they're in the computer. >> in the computer. it's so simple. >> they hired you as soon as they said we want a bunch of documents, correct? >> mr. wereful. you're a hostile witness. >> i'm not at all a hostile
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witness. >> a rare moment in congress today where they took a break from their usual dysfunction to agree on one thing in the form of a song. ♪ >> i want to see more of that right there every day in washington they ought to do that. >> that is great. i think we should force them to hold hands. >> john heilemann and harold ford, junior and eugene still with us. joining us msnbc political analyst dave schmidt and in washington nbc news chief white house correspondent and host of "the daily rundown" chuck todd. and david is here. >> we were going over the nasty battle down in mississippi, terrible battle. it shocked so many observers. >> some say it's not resolved. the nasty republican primary in mississippi is finally over. the losing candidate says it's
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not. he's not conceding. last night incumbent thad cochran surprised a lot of people by narrowly edging out tea party challenger chris mcdaniel. he won by more than 6,000 votes even though mcdaniel received more votes in the first showdown. the mississippi runoff defied conventional wisdom about getting out the vote. where did the new voters come from? the cochran campaign got help from the national republican senatorial committee and big names in the state like the barbours who helped turn out voters in strong cochran areas. cochran supporters actively sought out african-american democrats making the argument that cochran had delivered for mississippi. that appears to have worked. several heavily african-american communities saw major jumps in turnout all favoring cochran. heinz county, 75% african-american. cochran increased turnout there by nearly 50% from the previous election, to the tune of thousands of votes. mcdaniel has called the tactics
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to get liberals to vote in the republican primary illegal. >> it is illegal to expand your voting base. it is illegal to have people that aren't rich, old and white vote for you. it is illegal to have a message that appeals to people outside of your small, narrow base. let's hear him say that. >> oh, please, yes. >> this is not the party of reagan. but we're not done fighting. when we're done, it will be. >> there were literally dozens of irregularities reported all across this state. now it's our job to make sure the sanctity of the vote is upheld. before this race ends, we have to be absolutely certain that the republican primary was won by republican voters. >> steve schmidt, you know me. i'm a plain spoken guy, lincoln esing.
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i don't engage in hyperbole, but i'll use two words in this case. what happened last night in this republican runoff was historic and close to unprecedented. you and i both know as you go from primary to runoff, the voting base gets smaller. it gets more conservative in every case. i've never seen it expand and get bigger in a late june primary. that was stunning last night. >> look, it speaks a lot to the barbour political machine. governor henry barbour down in the state. the cochran voters were complacent going to the first round. they woerk up and said we don't want this guy to be the u.s. senator. the other remarkable aspect about it and boy, did it get this wrong. who'd of thunk it, the african-american voters determining the race. he sounds like that little kid
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who walks off the field with his football away from his friends because the play didn't go his way. >> he lost and lost by the rules that apply to both sides. let's go to chuck todd right now. chuck, give us your breakdown of this remarkable race. >> i'll give chris credit. it's like watching somebody pitch a perfect game. i'm trying to remember the last time an incumbent finished second in the primary and then the incouple bent goes on to win. that's number one. number two, a last-minute desperation call in the last ten days by cochran saying we can't win under the scenario of the normal rules of the runoff. let's try to expand the electorate. let's try to find new voters which is, by the way, what you do if you find out you're blocked one way. you say, why don't i try the other way. by the way, mississippi is 40% african-american. i would think any u.s. senator or anybody who wants to be a
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u.s. senator would want to find a way to get the support of and represent the entire state. that's just stunning. the other thing is, the cochran campaign about six weeks ago desperately tried to do something that all good incumbent survival campaigns do when they survive. they change it from being a referendum to a choice, and by calling into question mcdaniel's character, about six weeks ago, i think over the last six weeks they were allowed to get that message to go. by the way, one other thing on tea party. the one successful tea party candidate this year, is the guy where the tea party candidates didn't help them, dave bratt. >> if you look at the twitter last night from tea party types and hard right types, they were yelling and screaming, this is shocking and stunning. they expanded the republican electorate, that's exactly what beat eric cantor. it's one of the things. eric cantor had democrats going out and voting against him as
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well. not to this degree. this is remarkable. gene robinson, i've had a lot of republican candidates telling me that they were going to expand the electorate and they were going to get african-americans to cross over in primaries and vote for them. my response has always been the same, this coming from a guy that would get 50% of the vote from african-americans. i'd say good luck, good luck. it doesn't happen. so it's so shocking because this just doesn't happen in republican primaries. >> no, it doesn't. the reason it doesn't happen generally is that the republican candidates don't try to make it happen. thad cochran drew a distinction that was enough apparently for a good number of african-american voters to say, you know what? i think i'll go vote for him to vote against this other guy for a variety of reasons. it cracks me up, though, that the people who are yelling and screaming that he got black
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voters! we can't have that in the mississippi republican primary. well, good luck with that. >> cochran had a record of helping voters across the state including, he had a substantive record support programs throughout the state that african-american voters, all mississippi voters would like. this point, how mcdaniels is handling this afterwards. this guy lost. the rules of the game are what they are. to suggest that this was somehow an illegal act or some number of illegal acts on the part of the cochran campaign is more disheartening to me about the process than anything else. >> mika, we talked about it yesterday. republicans had a tough choice. they had a big spending republican against a guy with a very sketchy track record, questionable character, said some horrific things on talk radio through the years. it was a tough choice for
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republicans. that's why it was so close. >> i think it must have had some sort of impact in the end. some of those interviews where he was asked questions about some of the dirty politics that had happened, it was quite obvious he was not telling the truth. >> also the things he said in the past about women. >> african-americans. let's go to oklahoma, republican tea party candidate t.w. shannon brought out big star power to back his bid for the senate. >> something incredible is happening. liberty is under assault, but millions are standing up to turn our nation around. in oklahoma there are a number of good senate candidates, but t.w. shannon is a conservative fighter. he has the courage to look washington insiders in the eye and say i don't work for you, i work for the people of oklahoma. >> such a good guy. his name alone -- the democrats accuse us of not embracing diversity. oh, my goodness. he is -- he's it.
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he is, he is, he is the whole package. >> by the way, harold just said off camera he's moving to alaska. or is she in arizona now? >> or oklahoma. >> really? that's major star power, right? >> it is. it would get harold -- >> he is it. >> before this round here, there was palin and cruz and the people they supported. >> congressman james langford easily crushed shannon by more than 20 points. the seat opened up when senator tom coburn announced his resignation. coburn weighed in on state politics last week on "morning joe." >> i think there will be a backlash from their -- oklahomans don't like being told who to vote for. if you'll recall in 2004 when i ran washington was telling them what republican to vote for and spent millions of dollars
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backing that individual. that individual ended up getting about 30% of the vote when i got 62. oklahomans -- as a matter of fact, there's been op eds written on it. they'd just as soon everybody stay out. >> tom coburn -- >> he is a smart guy, yes, he is. people listen to him in oklahoma. they certainly did last night. >> they did. what's interesting, coburn was very careful. he didn't fully take sides. boy, any time he thought things got over the line in the attacks on langford, he stepped in. it was interesting, he played referee here. campaigns matter. langford ran a good old-fashioned smart, statewide campaign, sort of nose to the grindstone, didn't play -- didn't worry about star power, didn't worry about the -- some people were trying to turn this into some sort of tea party establishment thing. how is the statehouse speaker any less establishment than a member of congress? i always thought that that was a
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hard thing to play. is that ted cruz's first tv ad for somebody outside the state of texas? >> oh, my lord. >> that's a reminder. some of these outside groups, i don't know if they're vanity plays when they go in there for mcdaniel going for oklahoma or you look at club for growth this year, they're 0 for 2 in the big ones. mike simpson in idaho. mcdaniel and cochran here. i think the groups will realize they don't have the juice on capitol hill anymore that they once did. >> it's pretty surprising, steve schmidt, the turn of play over the past year. this has been a rough year for outside groups, been a rough year for some tea party heroes. >> for sure. it seems like the tide is coming out on this. when i was watching that, it just seemed like it had an "american idol" season 13 feel to it. you're watching ted cruz in that
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video. >> survivor oklahoma city. >> he seemed so happy about it. >> sarah palin seemed like she didn't even know who she was talking about. >> oh, come on. stop kicking around sarah palin. >> she literally flew in and i don't believe she could say his name. he is, uh, it. >> she had the right state. >> you also noticed the t-shirt. oh, my god. >> it was oklahoma sooners. >> it's called being in touch with the constituents. she could have very easily have worn a nebraska t-shirt, could have been an n and things would have gone really bad there. >> was it made in america? >> i'm sure it's made in america. >> mika, stop your hate on sarah palin. >> i'm not hating. i'm being honest. >> why do you hate when loving would be so much easier?
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>> all right. speaking of loving, former president bill clinton is defending his life. >> he loves her and i love him. >> bill clinton was talking about former secretary of state hillary clinton and the criticism over the family's financial status. this stems from comments made on her book tour when the possible 2016 candidate said her family was dead broke when they left the white house. she later said she and her husband are unlike other millionaires who are, quote, truly well off. in an nbc exclusive david gregory asked the former president about the perception of being just a tad bit out of touch. >> tad bit. >> do you understand some people who have been critical of mrs. clinton, secretary clinton who initially had to explain talking about being dead broke coming out of the white house or said in an interview -- >> i do. i might understand it differently than you do. it is factually true that we were several million dollars in debt. everybody now assumes that what happened in the intervening years was automatic.
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i'm shocked that it's happened. i'm shocked that people still want me to come give talks. i'm grateful. >> but when you say you pay ordinary taxes, secretary clinton said unlike other people who are really well off who paid taxes maybe off capital gains, can you understand as a political matter that can strike people as being out of touch? >> yes, but she's not out of touch and she's advocated and worked as a senator for things that were good for ordinary people. and before that, all her life -- and the people asking her questions should put this into some sort of context. i think i had the lowest net worth of any american president in the 20th century when i took office, but i still could have been tone deaf. now i don't and we've got a good life and i'm grateful for it. but i still -- we go to our local grocery store on the weekend. we talk to people in our town.
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we know what's going on. the real issue is if you have been fortunate enough to be successful, are you now out of touch and insensitive to the agonizing struggles other people are facing? that's the real issue. >> the agonizing struggle. >> the man who did that interview, david gregory joins us now. >> he goes to the grocery store and he's in touch with people, the agonizing choices that they have to make when they're at the whole foods there -- >> where you pay $18 for freshly cut carrots. >> david, a great interview. >> thank you. >> the clintons are worth $100 million according to tabulations on john heilemann's ipad. talking about going to the grocery store in chap qua and hanging out with regular people, there aren't a lot of regular people that aren't pretty wealthy themselves, they still can't come out and say we're
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really rich and we're really blessed. >> i think you've been talking about this a lot this week, joe. in many ways what i heard bill clinton saying was, look, we still think we're that couple from arkansas and certainly i, as a politics in arkansas didn't have a lot. i came into the white house and my life completely changed then and after that. i did have a lot of debt and things completely took off. what he's saying is your politics, positions, ideology ought to speak louder than your wealth. but you almost want to insert some language about, look, we get it. we're very wealthy now, but we're really committed to the right things. that's what he's arguing for. he made a reference, too, at one point saying once he talked about being dead broke, we had millions of dollars and we were in debt. she needed to clean that up and she did. she's not out of touch. i think it speaks to something else, whether you're a republican or democrat, you're a big establishment candidate or politician like the former president, like the potential
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candidate and secretary clinton, especially when you have big money ties to wall street and otherwise as maybe the leading couple in the democratic party outside of our current president, you're going to face these questions because the elizabeth warren crowd, other liberals who think all the establishment is completely out of touch with the struggles that they're feeling about wages, about jobs, about income distribution. these are real issues. >> i think it's also a real issue as it pertains to women and she could have made a negative a positive. instead of having bill have to clean up and not do as well in the first place, steve schmidt, do you think it would have been a mad mood to be as a woman extremely proud of what she's accomplished, financially and also around the world and talk about the desire to lift other women up financially and make women comfortable talking about money? clearly it's a female thing, that we feel it's untoward to say, well, we've done very well. i think there's a barrier there from the get-go. >> it could also be a rich
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politician thing. mitt romney had a similar problem over the course of the campaign relating to people. what's extraordinary about hillary clinton strategically as we look at the race is a couple months ago she had absolute control of the race, everything was frozen in place. nobody was going to make a move. if you watch this unfold over the last couple weeks, is it more likely to insent challengers to get in the race to say, hey, maybe lightning could strike, maybe we could take her in a campaign. i think she has degraded her standing in american politics over the course of the last couple weeks just by being out there as really a functional candidate even before the midterm. it's interesting. >> chuck todd, jump in. >> i would say her biggest vulnerability is always going to be this issue of whether they represent change and whether they're in touch with sort of 21st century america. the issue to me that it brought up was not about money, there was this defensive quality,
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almost like she was embarrassed about the wealth, and i get that. there's another issue for her that i think is just hard and it wasn't something that she had by choice. she hasn't walked alone in 22 years. think about this. she's had secret service protection for 22 years. again, it's her husband that was president of the united states. secret service insists that former spouses of presidents get this protection. but this is a bubble that she has now lived in for 22 years. now we're talking about a money bubble. that's something else. this is her great challenge, right? how does she -- how is she able to relate to average americans? and she has some hurdles. one of them is she's lived in this bubble for 22 years. >> i don't think they have -- i don't think bill clinton has driven a car since like about 1980 or so. they're certainly in a bubble. i want to ask david, we've talked a lot, david about hillary clinton being a little rusty as she's gone off in this soft launch book tour. she's not been a functioning political candidate for six
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years, since the end of the primary in 2008. bill clinton has -- he vacillates over the last few years. sometimes he's on his game and sometimes he's not. that answer seemed long to me as he answered you. i want to get a sense, do you feel like he was playing in top form or do you feel he's a little rusty? >> i didn't think he was that rusty. he was saying a few different things and he was a bit long-winded. i asked him more generally, does a politician of means have a harder time relating in today's populist politics? he said, no, people don't begrudge you doing well as long as you're transparent about it and then proceeded to answer the questions. he made a point of saying the people asking these questions -- in a couple of instances, he says, were not even old enough to vote when he first ran. i think this first came up in an interview with abc. so i don't know exactly which interview he was speaking of,
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but that the interviewer should contextize this for people and say you have a lot of money but you've always been committed to working families. that seemed a little off to me. but i do think what he was saying was actually what people or critics would have expected to hear him say from the get-go which s look, i'm really blessed, but the question is can i deliver for working people, and the answer is yes. i think there could have been more of a sense of, sometimes we get caught up in the sense of who we were and not who we've become. >> interesting what david says. you think of politicians, fdr, rich man, john f. kennedy, very rich man. people who grow up with wealth are very comfortable. in some ways they don't have toex plain it, they've always been rich. people like the clintons, they do remember themselves still as a struggling couple in arkansas. there's just -- there's not the fluency with it, they're being
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asked these questions really for the first time now. i think there's a -- >> it's amazing to me. >> he had the lowest net worth of any president in the 20th century. you can understand why they still feel that way. they were in the same financial situation when they were in the white house as they were in arkansas. >> i'm going to watch "meet the press" and watch the entire interview. of course former presidents make a lot of money. i made a lot of money like so and so and so and so, but god, i'm proud of hillary. look what she has done. she has broken the glass ceiling on so many levels including her abilities to make money like a guy does. am i wrong? this could have been turned into a positive from the get-go? >> absolutely. >> i think you're right. >> at the end of the day you have to be for what's real. at the end of the day they're for wealthy people. >> she's for women and she's paved such a trail for women, even on this level. what's wrong with that? in fact -- i don't know.
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i would be very inspired by someone who could say that. steve smith, thank you very much. chuck todd, we'll be watching "the daily rundown" at 9:00 shop. david gregory, your exclusive interview with bill clinton airs on "meet the press." up next, cobi jones is here. we'll ask under what circumstances might it be okay to bite someone? i don't understand. i'll try and learn. he held films to an extremely high standard. now a new documentary puts his life under review. we'll take a look at the new film only roger ebert in just a bit. up next, he fell on a grenade to save a fellow marine, now he has the nation's highest military award. we have the honor of welcoming william kyle carpenter to the set. we'll also hear from his proud mother. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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♪ the man you see before you today, corporal william kyle carpenter should not be alive today. we are here because this man, this united states marine faced down that terrible explosive power, that unforgiving force with his own body willingly and deliberately to protect a fellow marine. >> last week marine corporal kyle carpenter became the youngest living person ever to receive the medal of honor at the age of 24. retired marine corporal kyle carpenter joins us on the set, joined with his mom robin. i made that happen. i couldn't have you in the background. robin. medal of honor recipient,
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retired colonel jack jacobs joins us as well. kyle, congratulations. i'm not sure what the right word is. maybe it's just thank you. >> thanks for having me. >> you don't remember much about actually what happened. i've been reading and watching reports on you. was it told to yourks what you did? how did it come together after 40 surgeries and through all the pain of recovery, how did you learn about the final moments before everything went black? >> well, actually after my time at what was bethesda, now walter reed. after about two months there i went to richmond, virginia to a rehab center at the va. really after i spent about a month there and was on my way out of the hospital headed home to rest from my injuries, a buddy called me and he kind of actually let me know the story which up until that point i had no idea of. >> the story -- jack, you want to recount it? it's always hard for these guys
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to talk about their heroism. >> if you ask a medal of honor recipient talk about something, he'll never do it, but he'll say, let me tell you about kyle carpenter. everybody does it. all combat soldiers, marines, airmen, coast guardsmen, sailors all say the same thing. they want to talk about somebody else. there's a squad of you detached from a platoon. it went from a very small outpost to an even smaller outpost where these guys were holding the ford. a very small number of people against a fairly substantial enemy who attacked. a grenade landed on the roof where he was with one of his marine buddies and he shielded, saved his buddy's life by putting himself between the grenade and his buddy. you're talking about doing something in a split second that changes everybody's life
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including your own. >> so robin, tell me about how you first heard word of your son's injuries and how drastic they were. >> we were actually at church. it was on a sunday morning. we had gotten word through a friend of ours that nick, his buddy that was on the roof with him had been severely injured. so we had not gotten a phone call on our cell or anything. so when we got home, i thought we better check it out and see if it's on any other means of communication i guess. so i went and punched our home answering machine and the message was on our answering machine. >> what did it say? >> it was from a gunny from the pentagon. he said he was calling in regards to our son and he gave us the number to call back as soon as possible. and then my husband called and
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he basically -- he didn't tell us really how he was injured, just the injuries that he sustained. >> severe, drastic. >> severe. >> at one point i believe you were declared dead. >> yes, when i arrived at camp ashton, the first combat trauma hospital in afghanistan, upon arriving i was labeled pea, patient expired on arrival. >> 40 surgeries, countless hours of rehab. an unbelievable road back. i want to show a piece of video taken by your husband. you were together when the president called with some news. take a look. >> this is barack obama, how are you doing? >> fine, sir. how are you? >> i'm going to award you the medal of honor for your courageous acts in afghanistan. >> i couldn't get my eyes off you when you put your hand to your face, mom, when you heard the president say that. what was going through your
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mind? >> well, you know, as a mom, i would not have him injured, as a mom. so it's kind of like a bittersweet. if he was not injured, he would not have been awarded the medal of honor. so for me, that's kind of -- we're very, very proud of the marine that he is. >> i've seen pictures of this family at his bedside, in rehab. this is an incredible family. you think about the acts of heroism, jack, and you think about what the families go through. >> people forget frequently that people in uniform are not the only people who undergo all the trials and tribulations of service and sacrifice, that there are families behind them supporting them. then when our troops get hurt, they get better at least partially because they have the support network of other soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines and their families.
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it's only because of that community holding together that i think we have so many of our young people who served and sacrificed for us and managed to make it through. >> i'll say it because i know you're thinking it. there are so many who don't get recognized. so many that are not with us here today, and so many who are dieing every day, not even on the front lines. they're back home and we're looking at 22 a day in terms of suicide pertaining to ptsd. this is a story that goes far beyond you. at least we want to appreciate what you've done and thank you and, of course, raise awareness for all the families and for incredible mothers like robin. corporal kyle carpenter, thank you so much. robin, thank you for jumping on at the last minute. you must be very proud in some way. colonel jack jacobs, thank you. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." first you get hit by psoriasis.
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and now you get hit again. this time by joint pain. it's a double whammy. it could psoriatic arthritis a chronic inflammatory disease that attacks your joints on the inside and your skin on the outside. if you've been hit by... find out more about psoriatic arthritis. take the symptom quiz at doublewhammy.com and talk to your doctor. ♪ [ girl ] my mom, she makes underwater fans that are powered by the moon. ♪ [ birds squawking ] my mom makes airplane engines that can talk.
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[ birds squawking ] ♪ my mom makes hospitals you can hold in your hand. ♪ my mom can print amazing things right from her computer. [ whirring ] [ train whistle blows ] my mom makes trains that are friends with trees. [ train whistle blows ] ♪ my mom works at ge. ♪
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♪ joining us now, former member of the u.s. national team, now a soccer analyst, cobi jones. we're talking about biting. >> cobi is not a biter.
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>> and when you bite and when you don't bite. you never bite, right? >> correct. you never bite. >> okay. thank you very much. >> he's done this three times. i hate that we've got you here and we're actually talking about an incident like this, instead of the fact that uruguay is going through and italy didn't and england -- it's pretty historic. >> and spain didn't. >> this is huge, the fact that luis suarez has bitten apparently, bitten another player, it becomes the story of the day because there's so much other things we should be talking about, especially when we talk about the region and all the success they have had. >> is that not unbelievable? the power has shifted to this hemisphere. >> which is great to see because now that little bit of bias that we all see in european football this, european football that, we're talking about also south america and north america. that's very important. >> how do you explain that?
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this is what joe and i were talking about earlier today. england and spain -- >> and italy. >> out. three of them not getting out of group play, probably hasn't happened in the history of the world cup. what explains the failure of the big european squads in this tournament. >> one of the issues is playing down in brazil. completely different atmosphere, fan base isn't the same, the travel, the time change, those are all issues. but at this point we're seeing a little change in the soccer world, seeing the power like you mention shifting a little bit. we're seeing the con ka cav of north america is a lot better than everybody expected. when you're playing in conditions more favorable to that region. >> you mean the heat and humidity. >> yes, and just being in your own region, you'll be more successful. >> it usually makes a huge difference. france won the world cup when it was in france in '98. brazil wins when it's in brazil. let's talk about team usa, the
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first game, about 80 minutes, my son and i, he's a big soccer fan we were like, god, when are we going to get better? this is killing us. about 20, 30 minutes in, we looked at each other and says usa soccer has arrived. couldn't believe how they were moving the ball around, subtle, making space. it was pretty incredible. >> if you look at this u.s.a. team just over the past month, they've steadily improved with each game. even the send-off matches going into the world cup matches. first game against ghana, not the best play overall, but then against portugal. two moments, the beginning at the end, not great. >> not great. >> but the time in between, they played incredible. they dominated a portuguese team that was considered one of the best in the world. portugal wasn't even close. >> it was unbelievable. ranked fourth in the world and we dominated them for 80 minutes. >> with the win, what does usa have to do to tie or beat germany.
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>> i think they have to play like they did against portugal. don't make those couple of mental mistakes. if you play how you did against portugal, you dominate play, control the midfield especially, i think they have a very good clans of not just tieing this game, but probably winning this game because they played spectacular. i think they impressed everybody. >> what has klinsmann meant to america and american soccer? >> i think he's changed the way people are looking at the united states in soccer, not only within the u.s., but outside the country as well. he gets that natural respect as a coach because he's been there, he's done that. that's important not only from the outside world, but also within the team. you have a lot of players that it's difficult to relate to a coach that hasn't been there, that hasn't been part of it. but jurgen has been there as a player and a coach so he knows what to do. >> how far can the u.s. go? >> they can go all the way. the important thing is getting out of the group stage. after that, it's one game at a time. we've seen the u.s. before be
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successful. >> i love klinsmann totally. it's a prlt pretity good stuff. >> we'll be calling him the special one very soon. >> got to start biting more. >> no biting. >> not impressed. bbc poll that was out this morning on the radio said overwhelming people in britain don't think that he should be taken off the uruguay team, but they do want his front two teeth removed. up next, he made a career out of his reviews of films. now his wife says roger eastbound ert would have given a don'try on his own life two thumbs up. she joins us next along with the filmmaker who brought her late husband's life to the screen. we'll be right back.
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♪ this is one of the best films about american life than i have ever seen. for three hours i was totally absorbed by the story of these two families -- not just the kids, but their families. we get so many images in the movies of black inner city characters with guns and drugs and gangs, here are families struggling to make it. you don't hear all the four-letter words, 12-letter words. you sediner in on the table at night, kids getting up before dawn in order to take an hour and a half commute to go to school. >> that was roger ebert in 1994 praising steve james' groundbreaking documentary "hoop dreams." now steve james has made the renowned movie critic's life and career the focus of his latest
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film "life itself." steve joins us along with roger ebert's widow, chaz ebert, the vice president of the ebert company. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> the film looks a lot at his final days and his condition and how he struggled which you note, steve, is unusual for a person of stature to do. often they'll close up and not show themselves in perhaps a position of weakness. >> absolutely. there's levels of candor. usually with people who are well known or famous like roger, it's not like what he's shown in this film. that goes to the kind of man he was and the kind of critic. he prides that in documentaries and films, that kind of honesty and candor. so he was going to do it himself. >> he is a part of this, he took part in the last final months of his life, i believe. >> yes, but when they started the filmmaking, we didn't know it was the final months of his life. the plan was to do a film over a
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year's period and steve was going to show all the things roger was life had a different plan. roger passed away four months into the filming. that's what happened. and then so the film took a different trajectory after that. >> even after he lost his voice, he couldn't talk, he wasn't silenced. >> he wasn't silenced. >> i followed him on twitter and he stayed involved tweeting and writing and talking about things he cared passionately about. >> yeah, he was great. and actually we used to love -- you know, he liked politics so this was a show that we loved. we would watch it. >> did he throw things at the screen whenever i would talk? >> you know, actually you were the kind of republican that he liked. >> there are three of us. >> there were times that he would tell -- you could see steam coming out of mika's head and he would say you're right, stand your ground. >> that's so nice to hear. i love that. i'm just curious, when life took such a turn, were there any discussions not to do this
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project? >> you know what, roger was so brave, he was so -- he said, no, if we're going to do it, he told steve, show warts and all, show the man, not the icon. he was great. what i like about this movie is it's so life-affirming, even though some of it takes place at the end of his life, a lot of funny stuff, hilarious stuff with he and gene siskel. he looks death straight in the eye and says i'm ready, i'm coming. i'm ready and i'm not afraid. and i think it's just a gift that he left to us. >> you talk about gene siskel, you talked actually to siskel's wife, for the first time she's talked. >> absolutely. she had never done this before. she's a very private person, as gene was. but she really felt like she had to be a part of this. roger's relationship to gene other than the relation he had to chaz was the most essential relationship he had in his life. >> we showed the clip of siskel
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and ebert from the '90s. it's amazing that movie critics -- actually you see a clip of them and it takes you back to a certain time. as much as the movies they reviewed. that's just short of extraordinary. an artist once famously said there are no statues to critics. that's a pretty damn good statue right there. >> he was the first film critic if i read it right to win the pulitzer prize, is that correct? >> yes. >> and there is a statue. there's a sculpture of roger ebert being dedicated on july 4th in champaign, illinois. >> oh, that is so awesome. >> okay. for the record. go ahead, harold. >> what was his favorite movie and did you and he ever disagree about movies? >> his favorite movie is "citizen kane." i probably saw it a hundred
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times. yes, we disagreed about movies. one of my favorite movies was "clockwork orange" and he didn't like it. >> my son and i always debate over that one. so what was the biggest revelation to you getting into this documentary? >> well, you know, i knew how important roger was as a film critic. the most important film critic ever, really. but i wouldn't have made the film if it was just a film about that. i think the revelation was the extraordinary life he lived. and i mean he said he had a tremendous three-act life and it was more like a seven-act life, i think. and that -- his life informed his criticism. it's what made him suf an essential critic and a critic that spoke to people. >> "life itself" will be released in theaters, on demand and on itunes july 4th. chaz ebert and steve james, thank you so much. >> the quote that came out of
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the '30s, a statue has never been set up in honor of a critic needs to be taken down. >> more of "morning joe" in just a moment. [ brian ] in a race, it's about getting to the finish line. in life, it's how you get there that matters most. it's important to know the difference. like when i found out i had a blood clot in my leg. my doctor said that it could travel to my lungs and become an even bigger problem.
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coming up at the top of the hour, senator thad cochran has declared victory in mississippi, but his challenger is questioning his tactics that led to his victory and their legality. >> and their legality.
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i guess you're not supposed to expand the electorate. plus bill clinton responds to charged that his family, including his wife, is out of touch with the rest of america. did he help? >> he said he goes to whole foods in chappaqua so he's in touch with the peeps. and the no-fly list was meant to keep us safe but now one judge says the practice may need to go. we'll explain why when "morning joe" comes right back. ♪ ♪ [ girl ] my mom, she makes underwater fans that are powered by the moon. ♪ [ birds squawking ] my mom makes airplane engines that can talk. [ birds squawking ] ♪ my mom makes hospitals you can hold in your hand. ♪
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my mom can print amazing things right from her computer. [ whirring ] [ train whistle blows ] my mom makes trains that are friends with trees. [ train whistle blows ] ♪ my mom works at ge. ♪
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we all have a right to be proud of our state tonight. thank you very much. thank you for this wonderful honor and wonderful challenge that lies ahead. >> before this race ends, we have to be absolutely certain that the republican primary was won by republican voters. there is something a bit unusual about a republican primary that's decided by liberal democrats. >> he's not the first person who said that before. >> he's not? >> you know who else said that. people who worked on eric cantor's campaign. but people like him weren't complaining when it happened to eric cantor. he thought it was a pretty cool thing. but now oh, it's the worst thing that ever happened in american democracy. >> so as you wake up this morning, the nasty republican primary in mississippi is now over but the losing candidate doesn't think so. he's not conceding.
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>> really? >> no, he's not. last night incumbent thad cochran surprised a lot of people by narrowly edging out tea party challenger, chris mcdaniel. >> that was a humdinger as a certain college football coach used to say. just three weeks ago in their primary battle mcdaniel had all the momentum going but last night with nearly 56,000 more voters going to the polls, 56,000 more voters going to a poll in a late june runoff, that's shocking. that's just shocking. thad cochran pulled out a narrow victory. >> good morning, everyone. it's wednesday, june 25th. welcome to "morning joe." we have john heilemann, msnbc political analyst, former democratic congressman harold ford jr., president and ceo of politico and capital new york, jim vandehei and in washington,
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pulitzer prize winning columnist and msnbc analyst, eugene robinson. >> let's go around the table. gene, let's start with you. shocking result. if you look at what happened in mississippi, if you look at what happened in oklahoma, a lot of people that were backed by the likes of ted cruz and sarah palin and club for growth and a lot of the tea party groups went up in flames. >> not a great night for the tea party. a very good night for the republican establishment. a great night for hailey barbour and his folks in mississippi, for thad cochran. and chris mcdaniel -- it will be interesting to see how long it takes him to deal with the reality that, you know, he didn't win this race. he didn't win it and those liberal democrats who allegedly came out and voted against eric cantor came out and voted against him. >> yeah, they sure did. and it happens if you have an
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open primary. those are the rules. i don't personally -- >> there's no mechanism to overturn the results. he can not concede. >> let's go around really quickly and then get to the main news, but quick reaction to last night. shocking? >> pretty darn surprising. and i think it really is -- out of all the races, i think sometimes we make too much of the establishment versus tea party. in this case this was truly an establishment victory. they turned out 50,000 votes. >> eric cantor clearly lost connectivity with his district. thad cochran didn't. is it a surprise? a little bit. >> it's shocking we had three republicans on the set yesterday. for the first time in "morning joe" history. you go back to 1947, that never happened. all three of us said the way that republican primaries and runoffs work, thad cochran didn't have a chance. i'm stunned. >> just echoing what eugene said, really a great victory for hailey barbour and the whole of the mississippi establishment
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world that rallied around cochran. saw the warning when the runoff was going to happen, they all flooded down there and pulled it back together for him. >> let's talk about that. the mississippi runoff defied conventional wisdom about getting out to vote. where did those new voters come from? the cochran campaign got help from some big names, like the barbours who helped turn out voters in strong cochran areas. cochran supporters actively sought out african-american democrats making the argument that cochran had delivered for mississippi. it appears to have worked. several heavily african-american communities saw major jumps in turnout, all favoring cochran. cochran increased his turnout in minds county nearly 50% than the previous election. >> wow. >> mcdaniel has called the tactics to get liberals to vote in the republican primary illegal. this guy is --
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>> take it back to your talk radio show. >> last night he stopped well short of conceding, even being introduced, get this, he was introduced as the republican nominee. >> this is not the party of reagan. but we're not done fighting. when we're done, it will be. there were literally dozens of irregularities reported all across the state. now it's our job to make sure that the sanctity of the vote is upheld. before this race ends, we have to be absolutely certain that the republican primary was won by republican voters. >> john heilemann, pat buchanan always talks about political athletes and was talking about 2008 hillary, when her back was against the wall, was a great political athlete. this guy was not. as i said yesterday, thad cochran is not my type of republican. he's the type that drove me
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crazy when i was in d.c. he's a big appropriator, spends a lot of money. a lot of mississippi people think he's too establishment, too big of a spender, but a lot of it comes down to who were you running against? you look at eric cantor, he had a really good challenger, a solid guy. and that's why he won. in this case, this guy was a clown. you go back and listen to some of the things he said about women, the overtones about race. there's a reason why african-americans got out and voted against this guy. he scared them for good reason because of some things that he said that concerned them. >> in the candor race, the difference is this factor of the runoff, where it gave the barbour forces a chance to regroup and gave the whole state, including some of these african-american voters who normally wouldn't turn out for a republican primary, a chance to focus on what was happening. that pause which people thought the runoff will now be a lower turnout affair, mcdaniel will have all the momentum. in this case the pause allowed for reality to sink in.
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reality in the face of the republican establishment, reality for a lot of voters. the thing that you're talking about athletes, you watch the nba playoffs, you know. teams that know how to close, close every quarter, close a game. that's what winning is. this guy did not know how to close. >> he hasn't closed yet. >> he still hasn't closed. he still thinks the game is going on. >> let's go to oklahoma. so much to get to this morning. republican tea party candidate t.w. shannon brought some big names to help back his bid for united states senate. >> something incredible is happening. liberty is under assault, but millions are standing up to turn our nation around. in oklahoma, there are a number of good senate candidates, but t.w. shannon is a conservative fighter. he has the courage to look washington insiders in the eye and say i don't work for you, i work for the people of oklahoma. >> he's such a good guy and his name alone, the democrats accuse
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us of not embracing diversity. oh, my goodness. he's it. he is the whole package. >> what were you saying? >> ted cruz and sarah palin? >> what did you say harold ford? >> if i was a republican, i might have voted for t.w. >> you said you're an oklahoma fan now. >> i'm a sooner. >> i'm glad you cut yourself off. >> that was a great save. >> simmer down there. the ball was going out of bounds and you grabbed it. >> absolutely. >> you would think that would really -- you know, those people draw crowds. >> they really do, and this was -- >> they do. >> and this was a sharp candidate. but, you know, make your point though, joe. what was the night like for that group that went out campaigning? >> it was terrible. but it's very interesting. tom coburn, we had him on the show here about a month ago. what tom coburn said was, you know, oklahomans, we don't really need outsiders coming out telling us --
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>> why don't we show you that. >> telling us how to vote. this was tom on our show. >> i think there will be a backlash from their effect there. oklahomans don't like being told who to vote for. if you'll recall in 2004 when i ran, washington was telling them what republican to vote for and spent millions of dollars backing that individual. and that individual ended up getting about 30% of the vote when i got 62%. so oklahomans -- as a matter of fact, there's been some op-eds written on it. they'd just as soon they stay out and let us figure it out. >> so would it be the coburn common sense that would pull through or the palin/cruz star power. >> i don't think it carried today. >> no, it did not. >> i'm being sarcastic about sarah palin. >> we're not being sarcastic
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when we suggest that it's time for ted cruz and sarah palin to all pile back into the clown car and drive off to some other state and see what they can -- what mischief they can make. >> i think your take on sarah palin is far different than harold ford's this morning. >> harold begs to differ. >> let's talk about the curse. >> there's a cruz curse. >> what's that? >> look at what he's doing in the leadership races. look at the people that he's endorsing in these primaries. way more often than not, he's losing. he's been losing ever since he forced the paer into a government shutdown. the ted cruz wing of the party is a distinct minority of the party. there's lots of people who are very conservative who do not share his world view and share his heart edge and his hard edge is not prevailing. >> there was a time, jim, you remember, in 2008 heading into 2010 where sarah palin had the opposite effect. she was helping a lot of candidates and she was winning a
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lot of primaries for people. >> everywhere sarah palin went, the candidates seemed to win. she propelled some female governors. >> she endorsed cruz. >> and, you know, it's hard though to put this on ted cruz. something else much bigger has happened. the republican establishment has awakened. they saw what happened in 2010. and they know that harry reid should be back in nevada right now going to boxing matches in his pajamas and flip-flops and instead he's still running the united states senate. and the only reason that happened is because the republican establishment fell asleep and let a lot of people from clown cars win nominations. sharron angle, who should have never gotten through, harry reid should have been beaten. you can go to delaware and the woman who said i'm not a witch. you know, if they had put cassel in, that would have been another republican vote.
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you can go to skboindiana, anot vote against harry reid. again, thad cochran is not my type of republican, but there's one thing you know this morning, mississippi is in the republican column. you've got a guy going to washington, d.c., that's not going to vote for harry reid as majority leader. and a lot of republicans who in 2010, like myself, were glad to see real small government conservatives get elected, at this point would just like to see harry reid go home. >> right. >> and stop running the united states senate. so i'm just saying it's not fair to say this is all ted cruz. 2014 is radically different than 2010. >> or are you saying ted cruz is not the complete republican party. >> well, he's part of the republican party. but if i'm running for office, i sure as hell wanting the ted cruz wing on my side because they're knocking on doors. i've said this before, they're making the phone calls, they're going to the rallies, they're driving the campaign.
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so this idea that we have to choose one or the other, democrats don't choose one or the other. why does the liberal media say we have to choose one or the another. >> so this was a seat that republicans had to hold. this is not a pickup, so thad ro cochran is a hold. you've got two big races where democrats have a chance to pick up. they still may narrow this margin. >> i understand. but just saying if mcdaniel had won, there was a question mark, political observers said, over whether democrats at least -- >> but was there really? was there really a chance that mississippi was going to go in the democratic column? i was -- i'm very dubious on that score. i just don't -- didn't see mississippi going to "d." >> i don't either, but you know what, the republican party would have had to spend some money. they would have been worried about it, because chris mcdaniel has a long history of inflammatory remarks. and if lightning struck, there
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was a possibility they would have had to go in. now mississippi is off the list, they don't have to worry, thad is going up there and now they can focus on georgia, they can focus on kentucky, they can focus on north carolina, louisiana, you know. >> okay. former secretary of state hillary clinton from criticism over their family's financial status. it stems on comments made on her book tour when the possible 2016 candidate said her family was dead broke when they left the white house. she later said she and her husband are unlike other millionaires who are, quote, truly well off as opposed to -- >> how much are they worth? >> a lot. >> $100 million? >> so much. so in an nbc exclusive, david gregory asked the former president about the perception of being out of touch. >> do you understand some people have been critical of mrs. clinton, secretary clinton, who initially had to explain talking about being dead broke coming out of the white house or said in an interview that you all --
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>> i do. i might understand it differently than you do, though. it is factually true that we were several million dollars in debt. everybody now assumes that what happened in the intervening years was automatic. i'm shocked that it's happened. i'm shocked that people still want me to come give talks. so i'm grateful. >> but when you say you pay ordinary taxes, secretary clinton did say unlike other people who are really well off that pay taxes maybe just off capital gains, can you understand as a political matter that could strike people as being out of touch? >> yeah, but she's not out of touch and she advocated and worked as a senator for things that were good for ordinary people. and before that all her life and the people asking her questions should put this into some sort of context. i think i had the lowest net worth of any american president in the 20th century when i took office. but i still could have been tone deaf.
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and, you know, now i don't and we've got a good life and i'm grateful for it. but i still -- we go to our local grocery store on the weekend. we talk to people in our town. we know what's going on. the real issue is if you've been fortunate enough to be successful, are you now out of touch and insensitive to the agonizing struggles other people are facing. that's the real issue. >> i just -- i don't understand. by the way, bill clinton exclusive, i'm going to be watching, i know you are too, on "meet the press." that's going to be incredible. we all said the same thing. >> i didn't. i thought he was good. >> we all go to our local grocery store, except when we have our help go to our local grocery store. >> and the local grocery store in his town is not the local grocery store. >> i'm just saying. people go to grocery stores for different reasons. but anyway, why can't they just say, guess what, here, i'll do
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it, i used to not have money at all. i remember i had to -- i had to borrow $150 -- >> stop. >> -- from my parents to get my son, joey, a bass guitar. and now guess what, i get money, i get lots of money. i worked my ass off to get lots of money. and i worked around the clock for 25 years to get lots of money. and you know what? i am blessed. i am blessed to be an american. i am blessed that hard work pays off. i am blessed to be the luckiest guy on the face of the earth. but yes, i am rich. but that's not the issue because fdr was rich. you know, reagan was rich by the time he was president. a lot of great presidents were rich. the question is, can you still relate to people. it has nothing to do with going to the grocery store. just say it, they're rich and get over it. we don't care, we're proud of them for working hard and making money. >> so bill clinton's response, i think from the get-go hillary
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clinton's could have been so different and so ground breaking. i think she could have said, no, we've done incredibly well. we left the white house in debt but that was so easily fixed by all the work we were able to do. and quite frankly, put aside what bill made, i made a lot of money. i want to be a ground breaker for women and help lift them up. >> gene, it's the difference between republicans and democrats. we're proud when we work hard and make lots of money. i think some democrats are just guilty. maybe they feel guilty about being rich. >> do you really think -- >> ari is very proud to be rich. why can't they just say, gene, i'm rich. >> are you cuttinging thsuggest clinton is guilt-ridden when he goes to bed every night? i'm not picturing that. i don't think that's the case. >> why can't they just say we're wealthy and we're proud of it?
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>> i think she could have made it a plus. >> we worked hard, made a lot of money. god bless america. still ahead on "morning joe." >> i'm in love. i'm having a relationship with my pizza. >> i look like you're breaking up with the pizza. what's the matter? >> what do you mean you can't? it's your moral imperative to eat and enjoy that pizza. >> it's not every day julia roberts plays you in a movie. when your book sells more than 10 million copies, that shouldn't come as a surprise. author elizabeth gilbert joins us in a bit. plus for the first time in four decades, the u.s. is getting back into the global oil game. we'll explain why the change in policy. first, bill karins. i never can understand why with him. bill. >> do you want to? we'll get together and do lunch. good morning, everyone. we are watching rain this morning through new england. thunderstorms in the big cities this evening. yesterday it was indiana that dealt with the bad storms. right near indianapolis too.
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plainfield, they had a tornado go through. it was really one of the only tornados of the day yesterday, but it did knock into this houses. it was an ef-1, on the low end scale. it did a lot of significant damage there through plainfield. also the flooding in minnesota continues. it's a slow, slow process for all that water in the mississippi to slowly head out of the region, but most of the damage has already been done. so let's take you to today's concerns. we have the rain already heading all the way from northern ohio right back through western new york. we're continuing to watch the rain in northern new england. eventually this will form into some thunderstorms this afternoon. a little fog around new york city and philly. 30-minute delays at the philly airport. so far so good all the new york city airports. we'll get a good deal of rain out of this in the next 24 hours so have the umbrella ready from d.c. northward, but especially late today and all night tonight into tomorrow morning. there's the forecast. warm and humid, typical summer-like weather. much of the country actually feels like summer. it's very humid out there east of the rockies.
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chance of thunderstorms from dallas to florida, all the way to kansas city. as far as severe storms go about, four million people at risk of severe storms, including everyone in the denver area but i don't expect a lot of tornados, just damaging wind and hail with the strongest of those storms. the fog is beginning to lift a little bit in new york city. thunderstorms later on tonight. warm and humid. welcome to summer. you're watching "morning joe." nobody ever stomped their foot and asked for less. because what we all really want...
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let's take a look at the morning papers. "the wall street journal," the u.s. is set to export unrefined oil in the first time in nearly four decades. the commerce department has given permission to two companies to ship an ultralight
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oil to foreign buyers that can be turned into gasoline, jet fuel and diesel. shipments could begin as early as august. >> we've got the oregonian. the federal government is going to overhaul the no-fly list. a judge says passengers had no way to challenge a decision to remove them from their flights. >> "the new york daily news" a draft of the lyrics to the bob dylan song "like a rolling stone" sold for $2 million. >> $2 million? >> $2 million yesterday at an auction in new york. it's believed to be the highest price ever paid for a popular music manuscript. the draft is written in pencil on four sheets of stationery from a hotel in washington, d.c. look at that, $2 million. it is the only known written draft of the song. dylan was just 24 when he recorded it in 1965. >> joe doesn't want to admit it
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but he's the one that bought that. " the boston globe" says researchers have a 3-d mammogram now that could significantly improve the rate of breast cancer detexz. it takes multiple x-rays and creates a 3-d image of the breast similar to a cat scan. they use the technology and reported a 41% increase in the detection of potentially lethal cancers. ken vogel writes about a well funded democratic operative who is looking to beat the koch brothers at their own game. david brock is reportedly telling his party that there is no problem in spending millions of dollars on politics while simultaneously attacking the koch brothers for doing the same thing. according to the article -- >> look at that hair. his hair is as crazy as mine. >> not quite. >> according to the article -- >> it's in the ballpark but not quite as bad. >> it's getting close. i'm sorry. we could do a split screen. >> according to the article, democrats are facing a, quote, fundamental strategic question.
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are we really that different from the kochs and do voters really care? >> so you guys have been writing stories about this, about democrats wringing their hands but also about this group that's gotten together. i have short-term memory loss so i don't remember exactly the name of the group that you guys are writing about, but you said they're going to raise gazillions of dollars and their goal is to outkoch the koch wror brothers. >> democrats are so tortured with the relationship with money. so you've got all these multimillionaire billionaires who they want to put a lot of money into politics. they're tortured about it. should we do it if we're telling everyone basically the koch brothers are criminals. what they're saying is hypocritical. you can't say that's awful but when we do it, it's great. the way the campaign finance laws are structured, if you care about politics, you should spend gones gobs of money. >> barack obama became the first
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billion dollar candidate. he knows how to raise and spend money. >> exactly. the reality is that both major parties raise enormous sums of money. where do you raise that money? you get it from people who have enormous sums of money. so, yeah, hypocritical, whatever, democrats can say our billionaires are spending their money on behalf of the american people. on behalf of the ordinary, american, working class and whereas the koch brothers are spending their money on their own behalf so that they can have, you know, car elevators in their mansions. >> i would love a car elevator in my mansion. >> you remember, talk about this is -- obama tied himself up in knots over this question, over super pacs in 2012. we can't endorse a super pac on the democratic side so i won't meet with them so my operatives will. by the end of the campaign it collapsed and obama was out at
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jeffrey cakatzenberg's house dog a fund-raiser. in the end they'll all end up taking this money. >> harry reid has been such a hip krat about the koch brothers. >> it's so tone deaf. there's no evidence over the last decade -- >> voters don't care. >> first of all, voters don't care, but what's happened? harry reid has driven more money underground and has inspired people to give more money to the koch brothers. this is a strategy -- you know people on twitter -- people or twitter get riled up about the koch brothers. liberals in the blogs. it just -- harry reid doesn't understand that this back fires. it's driven more money underground and got the koch brothers raising more money. >> voters don't care. >> and voters don't -- it's a did care, barack obama would have caught a lot of guf for breaking his promise in 2008 and destroying the public finance
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system. >> voters don't care. they do not care. >> he talked about how when he came back to the u.s. after his accident, the first thing he saw when he was brought into an incredible hospital was the koch brothers had funded -- you know, on the wall. he went through a whole list of all the incredible things they did for this country. >> did he really? lawrence o'donnell did? >> hospital for special surgery. >> they have done extraordinary things. willie geist has talked about it all the time, about what they have done for medical research -- >> for arts. >> what they have done for lincoln center, what they have done for this city is absolutely unbelievable. you can say i disagree with them and they're spending lots of money. >> it's convoluted. if we can just take a look, i want to see this split screen. i'm going to say it's -- >> joe, your hair is crazier. >> i think i've got more lift. >> i just don't like watching you do that.
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>> it just goes on. >> you could get that up higher. look at that! coming up, google wants to dominate your tech life from wearables to how to watch tv. but will their plan be enough to keep apple and amazon at bay? that and a look at what will be driving the markets this morning straight ahead on "morning joe." just take a closer look. it works how you want to work. with a fidelity investment professional... or managing your investments on your own. helping you find new ways to plan for retirement. and save on taxes where you can. so you can invest in the life that you want today. tap into the full power of your fidelity greenline. call or come in today for a free one-on-one review.
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business before the bell -- >> that's a suarez. >> brian sullivan is here to talk about business. >> brian is here. we're talking about -- >> put the lotion on its skin or it gets the hose again. >> what are we talking about here? >> your buddy, luis suarez. >> silence of the lambs. >> let's talk about suarez really quickly. what's going on? >> listen, the dude has got problems. as a liverpool fan, i don't know how you can support the guy. that's what we were just talking about during the commercial break. >> well, i'm glad he did it because he was going to go to barcelona or real and now he's going to be stuck in england and score 31, 32, 33 goals. >> even ron artest never bit
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anybody. >> of course tyson did, so it's not unheard of. he's a biter. and almost everybody is a biter at some point. most people are a biter up until they're 2 or 3 or 4 years old and they stop the biting, but some people are just a biter. >> stop being so judgmental. maybe it's a cultural thing. >> he's a biter. >> the media is just, yeah. >> he's a biter. >> that's just what happened. >> you don't know. >> be careful. talk to you later. >> really just spinning out of control. >> there but by the grace of god. >> google is making a big play in tv, aren't they? >> we should care. >> why? >> because we work in television. >> tell me about this. >> you've got apple tv. they call it a set-top box. you've got comcast, our parent company, time warner, charter, whatever, they have the set-top box. apple has their own, amazon and now google is set to roll this out. the space is getting crowded for this. the fight to control your living room is on and it's a big one
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and it's going to be hard to get noticed. john and i were talking about this before the show. this is a big move by google. obviously our parent company and others are going to -- it's interesting because we provide the pipes but also provide content so it's going to be a real interesting dance the next couple of years. >> this is content right here, isn't it? >> sort of. >> with quotation marks around it. >> it's a big move by google. >> you know who runs my living room? my 6-year-old. we watch spongebob all the time. >> is your 6-year-old a biter? >> no, he's not a biter, never been a biter. >> mika, let's you and i have -- you're the only one here i like, mika. let's talk about oil. for the first time in 40 years, the u.s. will now be permitted to export oil. this is actually a big story. >> what? >> yep. >> what? >> think about that. >> right now "the wall street journal" has the story exclusively. i was working with some folks last night. pioneer natural resources, one of the two companies, they wouldn't -- they sort of stumbled around the confirming of it. >> bring it in for a landing.
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>> if you want the official note to come out, then you want to let the president or the government -- >> what are you talking about? what's happening? >> right now you cannot export oil. >> good. i understand. so land the plane. >> i will, captain. settle down. right now for the first time ever, you're going to be able to export oil, for the first time in 40 years. >> didn't you say that in the first sentence? >> yes, but you keep jumping in. >> what changed? >> so the commerce department is going to permit two companies. >> and why? now explain why. why -- >> because we are producing too much oil in certain spots to get it to refineries and we're essentially wasting resources. that's the thinking. >> what does that mean to the economy? >> what does it mean to gas prices? you're going to hear people screaming that this will raise gasoline prices, joe, because now it's providing competition. some people suggest not the case because you can already export -- you guys are unbelievable. you can already export gasoline.
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>> you're causing problems for me. >> batman. >> if you take him by the hand and lead him to it, you can get the story. it just takes a little effort. >> feels like first year law school. >> you're fantabulous. >> what does the whole thing mean? >> what is this, a paper chase? coming up next, she wrote a mega best seller, julia roberts played her in a movie and now she's about to go to know tour with oprah. this is huge! international best-selling author elizabeth gilbert joins us, and we're not going to have to walk her through the conversations the same way we have to walk brian through. we are back.
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you will lose all your money. i think in the next six to ten months. don't worry, you will get it all back again and you will come back to bali and live here for three or four months and dittea me english. i never had anybody to practice my english with and then i will teach you everything i know. >> that was a scene from the 2010 movie "eat, pray, love." and the woman behind the blockbuster film and memoir, new york times best-selling author elizabeth gilbert joins us now. good to see you again. >> nice to see you. >> one of your other novels is now out in paper back. it's great to have you. >> thank you. >> the first novel in 12 years, did extraordinarily well. >> thanks. >> i guess it was worth the 12-year wait. >> yeah, it was. i'm also excited that readers
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decided to come with me on this journey about a spinster who studies plants. it's not necessarily obviously a hit. >> and it's interwoven. a spinster who falls in love with an artist who actually takes her out of science and into the realm of love. >> yeah. i wanted to write one of those novels that i love to read, a big multi-generational novel of ideas, like the great 19th century authors who i've always loved. >> her father was an industrialist. >> he was sort of founded the pharmaceutical industry. her father made his fortune in the medicinal pharmaceutical trade. she grew up in this rarefied world of ideas. >> it's like weed now, it's the pot industry now. >> you always got to get it down to the base level. i actually think as you describe it, i can't understand why anybody wouldn't want to read
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this book. >> put a little blush on there about that. who wouldn't want to read this. i mean it's the kind of book i would like to read. i feel like you should always write the book that you would want to read, the one that you would be drawn to. >> what draws you to it? >> strong female character. it's almost -- i almost like talking more about what it's not about. it's not about a woman whose life is either ruined or rescued by a man and it's difficult to find novels about women that don't hinge on that story. there is love in the story but ultimately she stands on her own feet and finds her own vocation, which is something worth celebrating, and it's got action, adventure, travel, water falls. >> sex? >> yeah. >> yeah. >> there's sexy time. i'm not going to write a book that doesn't have sex. >> is there biting in the book? there's no biting in the book. >> sorry about them. >> we're not going to talk about the sex part of it, but how does this relate to your own life,
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autobiography, there are obviously some connections here. >> well, it's about a woman whose passion for her vocation is the central focus of her life, which is something that i can identify with completely. i think women need a vocation. you need something in your life that belongs to you that has nothing to do with your relationships, which doesn't mean that you don't need, love and cherish your relationships, but you need something consistently that's your own. and ike women in the 19th century needed that as much as they do now and this woman found herself in a world of bougtany. >> my mother is an artist, really struggled with that, but it's not easy. >> it's not easy, but i think i'm talking differently about -- i'm not talking about career professionalism necessarily, i'm talking about a strain of passion that's yours. and it doesn't have to be easy for me, it just has to be interesting. and i think women need something in their lives that continually interests them. >> you are touring with oprah, by the way. it's like we buried the lead.
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but tell us about that. this is really exciting. >> yeah, it's amazing. they called me up and oprah is doing an eight-city tour in stadiums for inspiration for women audiences, would you be available to come. >> and you said let me check my schedule. >> i will wash her car. i can be over in five minutes to mow her lawn. i will do anything that she wants me to do because i think she's amazing and it's a great opportunity to speak to a large audience of women about important things. >> fantastic. that's really exciting. are you guys going to buy tickets? she's amazing. >> no, but where she lives, by the way, i live in new jersey. frenchtown, visit it, it's a -- the town is a spectacular little town on the delaware river. good luck to your husband, who's a brazilian. >> it's really intense. >> is he nervous? >> i have to say he's coming
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over to be a united states fan because he's rooting for the scrappy underdogs. >> is he a biter? >> i can't disclose that on live tv. >> elizabeth, let me help you out. "the signature of all things" is now available in paperback. up next, congressional leaders come together -- look at this. it's all good. it's all good. >> is that photo shopped? >> that's real. >> they come together in a rare show of bipartisanship. we'll tell you why. spokesperson: the volkswagen passat is heads above the competition,
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my hope is that this gold medal ceremony today serves to honor dr. king and all who set out to answer what he called the most urgent question. what are you doing for others. >> as dr. king said, the time is always right to do what is right. it is only right that we fulfill the promise of the civil rights act by ensuring every american's right to vote is protected. >> it is fitting and appropriate that on the 50th anniversary of the passing of the civil rights act of 1964, we honor this
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unbelievable couple, dr. martin luther king jr. and his beloved wife, mrs. coretta scott king. they were my friends, my brother and my sister. >> members of congress commemorate the 50th anniversary of the civil rights act by honoring dr. martin luther king and his wife, coretta scott king. the event brought together leaders who spend much of their time fighting. yesterday they were hand in hand in a bipartisan rendition of "we shall overcome." >> that's fascinating. brian sullivan just brought up -- got some breaking news. there's been a revision in the economic -- in the economy first quarter of the year. what is it? >> so it came in initially as a negative 1% contraction. they have revised it down to a 2.9% contraction for the first quarter. >> that's almost a 3% decline in the economy the first quarter, a lot of it weather related. how does that stack up, though, historically? >> according to dow jones just looking at it now, joe, it's the
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biggest nonrecession quarterly drop in 58 years. but you brought up the key word, the "w" word. here's the thing, weather. i know everybody likes to blame everything on the weather. this quarter really actually was horrible. like you couldn't -- people didn't go to restaurants for weeks. so we're waiting to see what happens, which with the second quarter and whether we're not going to completely sharply rebound. that negative 2.9% contraction is a big number, but people are optimistic going forward. they still are. >> i heard mika, the weather was so bad, especially in upstate new york, that bill clinton didn't go to the local grocery store for two weeks. do you believe that? >> that does it for us here on "morning joe." >> what did you learn? >> i learned we are not going to go over because chuck todd has "the daily rundown". >> there's a distinction between those who love biters and those who despise biter. you're pro biter. >> after this short break, we'll be right back.
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the incumbents strike back. thad cochran pulls off a win in mississippi that no one has done in 80 years. and it looks like new york's charlie rangel could squeak by for one more term, but nothing is official yet. plus

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